MOUNT
Rainier

Mount Rainier National Park Paradise Inn icon

WELCOME TO MOUNT RAINIER

The Great Peak itself; Mount Rainier looms 14,408 feet, or three miles above the tidewater; two miles of this towering height being above the timber line and perpetually snow-covered. The wonderful fairyland parks; Paradise, Indian Henry’s, Van Trump and a dozen others were once glacier-covered, but are now literally carpeted with beautiful mountain flowers. They are hedged around and dotted here and there with young fir, cedar, and other trees. No effort of man has ever accomplished anything approaching the appealing beauty of these natural mountain parks. (Rainier National Park Brochure, Stanley Bell PTG Co. Tacoma, 1920s)

PARK FEATURES

Bridge crossing by Christine Falls at Mount Rainier National Park

CHRISTINE FALLS

Skyline Trail at Mount Rainier National Park

SKYLINE TRAIL

Longmire Bridge covered in snow at Mount Rainier National Park

LONGMIRE BRIDGE

HISTORIC PHOTOS

Historic black and white photo of Paradise lodge at Mount Rainier

One of the handsome and comfortable hostelries of Uncle Sam’s national parks, Paradise Inn occupies a spot of unique beauty and interest, commanding on one side great slopes of flowering meadow plants and on the other side the majestic shoulders of Mount Rainier.

Vintage car driving through forest at Mount Rainer black and white

The forests few deciduous trees, but are remarkable for the variety and beauty of their conifers. The dense evergreen forests characteristic of the lower western slopes of the Cascades extend into the park in the valleys of the main and West Fork of White River, the Carbon, the Mowich, the Nisqually, and the Ohanapecosh. (Mount Rainier National Park Brochure, Department of the Interior, 1920) 

WHY WE LOVE THIS PARK

Simply put, this mountain dominates all of its surroundings. The enormity of its scale takes your breath away, and its awe-inspiring presence is beyond description. Put Rainier on your bucket list as a must-see destination.

SCENIC HWYS ILLUSTRATIONS

MOUNT RAINIER NATIONAL PARK: ROAD TO PARADISE

Beginning in 1903, Eugene Ricksecker’s fieldwork resulted in uniquely engineered roads within Mount Rainier National Park. His challenge included highlighting the scenery while preserving an easy grade for automobiles. He designed the “Road to Paradise” to keep tourists “in a keen state of expectancy,” where new visual pleasures would emerge at every turn. Mount Rainier was the first park to admit autos in 1907 and by 1912 they reached all the way to Paradise on Ricksecker’s road.

Posters are available with fade resistant, UV treated inks on stiff coated paper. They also include a matte UV finish that reduces glare. At 14″ x 22″ it is the perfect size for display.

LOOKING FOR MORE SCENIC HWYS ART?

DISCOVER NEARBY PARKS

View of Crater Lake National Park

A mountain that has collapsed upon itself and the rain-fed lake that survives within its basin. Set out along Rim Drive to discover a majestic thoroughfare does not disappoint.

Steam rising from the grounda t Lassen Volcanic National Park

The dynamic nature of Lassen is always on display. Scenic meadow trails and azure lakes play counterpoint to charcoal cinder cone hills and steaming volcanic vents.

Green forested hills of Olympic National Park

From Pacific beach sea stacks to mossy inland rainforests to Mt. Olympus’ snowy peak, this park is a poster child for some of Mother Nature’s most picturesque biodiversity.

EXPLORE REGIONS OF AMERICA

Vista Region road sign icon

Where the warm sandy seashores and the high Sierras meet—wander beneath timberlines that touch the sky, scale granite cliff monoliths, and be inspired by majestic inland valleys.

Rocky Region road sign icon

The Rocky Mountains are a  picturesque territory brimming with biodiversity. Set off on an expedition across crater-pocked lava beds, climb snow-crowned mountain peaks, or traverse dense alpine forests.

Plateau Region road sign icon

Enter into a land of timeworn desert vistas. Here you will discover the striking masonry of red rock wonderlands, expansive river-cut canyons, and the far-flung frontiers of the hoodoo wilderness.

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